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A Home of Dreams Even with Bad Credit

A Chapter 13 Bankruptcy (repayment plan) does not have to be discharged and you can buy a new or a resale home as long as you have been in the Chapter 13 Bankruptcy for at least 12 months and your chapter 13 payments have been made on time for at least one full year, although you may wish to check with a Sacramento bankruptcy attorney first. Lenders like to see that you have re-established credit while in the Chapter 13. However if you have not re-established credit, lenders will s ometimes use alternative credit. Alternative credit will sometimes include utility bills, insurance bills, cell phone bills, etc. It’s important for lenders to see that you have a strong payment history while you are trying to re-establish your credit.… Read more

The Chance to Have a Life in the United States

The services offered by immigration lawyers in the USA are of great assistance when a person makes a decision to immigrate to the USA. The best immigration attorney in NYC can determine the most suitable visa category for you. They offer you an interactive, innovative, and easy-to-use questionnaire that asks for all the basic facts and information required to start your visa process. In addition to the above, the lawyers assist with investor visas, litigation and appeals, consular processing, permanent residence, student visas, and global visas. They also handle naturalization procedures of foreign nationals who wish to become US citizens, and legal issues associated with refugees. They advise clients on employment verification, government audits and investigations. Additionally, they obtain green cards for clients and advise them on strategic ways to obtain them fast.… Read more

Unpaid Bloggers Take Huffington Post to Court

One of Huffington Post’s many unpaid contributors has recently filed a $105 million law suit as of April 12, targeting the very site they’re writing for. The suit filed by Jonathon Tasini is against the Huffington Post, its co-founders Arianna Huffington and Kenneth Lerer and also its new owner: AOL. Jonathan’s official title is writer and union organizer, though a more accurate title would be to call him yet another Winklevoss twin, suing for the chance to earn some easy cash. For those who don’t know, the Winklevoss twins were cast in The Social Network, the movie about Facebook – but what’s more interesting is that these twins sued Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in 2004 for allegedly stealing their idea for Facebook. Four years later, the Winklevosses settled with Facebook for what is now worth $200 million, but later returned to court hoping to swindle even more out of the deal. Earlier in April, Judge Alex Kozinski denied the request. Kozinski did not have kind things to say about the ordeal, he wrote that the “Winklevosses are not the first parties bested by a competitor who then seek to gain through litigation what they were unable to achieve in the marketplace. … At some point, litigation must come to an end. That point has now been reached.” Which begs the question, if Kozinski was able to see through the Winklevosses swindle, why did the judge of the original settlement not reject the claim in the first place? If only we could advance the judicial system enough to throw gold diggers out in the street before they kick up such a fuss. Jesse Strauss, one of Tasini’s lawyers, conceded he was taking shots in the dark when he spoke to Jeff Bercovici of Forbes’. “The legal theory we’re going on is… Read more